Recent Posts

The vocabulary of the business world often helps us understand not just business, but life. One of its newer phrases is "managing the decline," which Wikipedia defines as "the management of the decline (or 'sunset') phase at the end of a lifecycle, with the goal of minimizing costs or other forms of losses and harm." In other words, decline is a given. What are you going too do about it?

What you do each day is important, but sometimes, it is the long trend that is the better measure of our hearts. Zacharias, John the Baptist's father, is a great example.

Sometimes, having two bosses can work (right now, I have four), especially if these bosses are working towards complimentary goals and the competing time demands can be managed. In this kind of setup, it is mostly a matter of sorting out what each boss needs at any given time, and on a good day, many of our actions can be applied to meet multiple needs. (The lesson plan I prepare for one department can be used when I guess lecture at another, for example.)

Can this idea of keeping two bosses happy be applied to our view of government? Jesus seems to think so.

I'm reading a book a friend recommended, The Myth of a Christian Nation. There are parts I like and parts I don't like, but one very postitive thing it is doing is forcing me to examine my view of government.

A key passage for many people when they think about government is Romans 13:1-6:

For a short while before he wrote Peanuts, Charles Schultz wrote a comic strip called Li’l Folks. What I love about that title (and apparently, Schultz preferred it, too: he is reported to have hated the name Peanuts) is the hint at the depth Schultz was aiming at. He did not write comics strictly for children. He wrote about the human condition, the condition that all “folks” must deal with, big and little.